James K. A. Smith on the missing Author in authorial intent hermeneutics

I realize this is a week old, which in the blogosophere can make something quite stale, but I had some thoughts on James K. A. Smith’s surprisingly negative review of Peter Enns’ recent The Evolution of Adam: What the Bible Does and Doesn’t Say about Human Origins. Smith’s criticism focuses on Enns’ methodology, which is based […]

Wednesday, May 2nd, 2012

Classifying Christian origins positions

Parchment and Pen has a post up that seeks to classify  the different Christian views on origins. C. Michael Patton is usually pretty good at describing different points of view sympathetically, and things were going along pretty uncontroversially as he described different types of special creation, that is, views of creation that envisage miraculous intervention of […]

Tuesday, May 10th, 2011

A new, definitive introduction to the Adam/evolution problem in Christian theology

If I’ve said it once, I’ve said it a thousand times: devout evangelicals will never be able to come to terms with evolution as long as they believe that it denies the existence of an historical Adam with an historical Fall. As goes creationism, so goes Christianity. Some will cling to their Christianity so tightly […]

Wednesday, February 23rd, 2011

Facing the music: genocide is just genocide

Kenton Sparks contributes a humdinger of a post today, the second post in a seven-part series entitled “After Inerrancy: Evangelicals and the Bible in a Postmodern Age.”  He begins with a starkly stated proposition:  The factual contradictions within Scripture or between Scripture and extrabiblical sources cited in my previous blog are not, in my view, […]

Thursday, June 10th, 2010

Where do we go once leaving Paul’s Adam? (BioLogos)

I have really enjoyed Pete Enns‘s contribution to BioLogos of late. His latest frames the Adam/Eve question in an interesting and honest way. Here’s an excerpt related to my last post: What if we affirm that Paul’s view of human origins does not settle the matter for us today? Of course, this leaves us with a […]

Tuesday, April 6th, 2010

Why Genesis 1 was written

Not that I have all the answers, of course. I thought I’d reproduce a summary of my current thoughts on the issue that I formulated in an interesting comment exchange under a post on another site. I asked what sort of question the authors of Genesis 1 etiology intended to answer: [1] why the world exists, [2] how it got […]

Thursday, February 11th, 2010

Chaos in Genesis and Germanic mythology

Dr. Enns has recently reminded us that the Ancient Near East conceptualized the beginning of creation as a battle between order and disorder, the gods vs. chaos. We see the chaos of the natural world represented as an antagonist in the Genesis cosmogony. The forces of chaos are never quite given the dignity of a […]

Thursday, February 4th, 2010