James K. A. Smith on the missing Author in authorial intent hermeneutics

I realize this is a week old, which in the blogosophere can make something quite stale, but I had some thoughts on James K. A. Smith’s surprisingly negative review of Peter Enns’ recent The Evolution of Adam: What the Bible Does and Doesn’t Say about Human Origins. Smith’s criticism focuses on Enns’ methodology, which is based […]

Wednesday, May 2nd, 2012

Diachronic considerations in biblical lexicography

While studying NT Greek in undergrad, I became interested in linguistics. I gradually became alarmed as I discovered that key insights into human language made by linguists were hardly ever taken into account among scholars intending to interpret the Bible from the original languages. Greek and Hebrew are treated by too many exegetes as special […]

Tuesday, January 24th, 2012

Classifying Christian origins positions

Parchment and Pen has a post up that seeks to classify  the different Christian views on origins. C. Michael Patton is usually pretty good at describing different points of view sympathetically, and things were going along pretty uncontroversially as he described different types of special creation, that is, views of creation that envisage miraculous intervention of […]

Tuesday, May 10th, 2011

The Passion, prophecy, the pedigree of proof-texting, and a podcast

Mark Goodacre’s latest NT Pod discusses the high concentration of “according to the Scriptures” tags in the Gospels’ Passion narratives and asks whether the Passion narratives are prophecies historicized (as argued by Crossan) or tradition scripturalized. The specific context of his discussion is the Passion narratives, but the principle that will explain it goes for […]

Wednesday, April 13th, 2011

The Human Faces of God: peer reviewing the biblical authors

Review: The Human Faces of God: What Scripture Reveals When It Gets God Wrong (and Why Inerrancy Tries to Hide It) Author: Thom Stark Wipf and Stock, 2010 Chapter 10: “Into the Looking Glass” By this point in the book, and undoubtedly long before, what everyone’s asking is, “So what’s his solution?” How can we read this […]

Wednesday, March 9th, 2011

The Human Faces of God: making excuses for your alcoholic uncle

Review: The Human Faces of God: What Scripture Reveals When It Gets God Wrong (and Why Inerrancy Tries to Hide It) Author: Thom Stark Wipf and Stock, 2010 Chapter 9: “Textual Interventions” If you hadn’t known it before picking up this book, at least by chapter 9 you’d be pretty sure that inerrancy is a wholly unsuitable […]

Monday, February 21st, 2011

A high view of Scripture isn’t a literalistic one

Even if the book of Jonah didn’t feature the famous big fish, it wouldn’t take much serious study before you realized that it’s not an historical account. Doug Chaplin cites fourteen facts about the book of Jonah that taken together should really point any thoughtful reader aware of the basics of how literature works away from […]

Sunday, January 9th, 2011