Clinics to grow human eggs

“A major advance in fertility treatment is signalled today as doctors unveil details of a technique that will allow human eggs to be grown in the laboratory from ovarian tissue samples.

IVF treatment

The procedure, which is being pioneered by two British fertility clinics, involves taking a piece of ovary tissue from a woman and ‘banking’ it in a laboratory until she is ready to start a family.”

Read the rest here.

Interesting. What do you think about this? Any possible ethical/theological problems? What about those people we always assumed were just never meant to have their own children? If there are such people, can we assume that God will find a way for the procedures involved to not work? Any other issues that come to mind?

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  • Interesting blog choice… while I know that there really isn’t anything that is a “gray” issue, it’s hard to say if this advancement is right or wrong. On one hand, it could really help a lot of couples who want a biological child, but are scared of the health risks that IVF poses. On the other hand, just because something CAN be done, SHOULD it be done? While this is not cloning, it is taking the creation of life in a lab one step further. All in all, I would have to say that it’s a positive advancement, because it’s not that different from IVF, which I don’t believe is wrong. This process sounds as though it is safer for the woman. As for your question about whether or not some people are just not meant to have children, the Bible clearly says to multiply, and it praises the man who has many children. The Bible also views barrenness as a curse. There are so many environmental factors that can influence fertility, from pesticides to hormones in meat and dairy, that people who could be “meant” to have children could be rendered infertile from things they have no control over. The question of being able to manipulate having children ties into free will, and whether or not you believe that God preordains every event, or whether He allows us to alter our fates. As an adoptee, I would like to see the couples who can’t conceive adopt, because there are so many children across the world who are in desperate need of good homes. International orphanages are often worse than the prisons in the same country. Yet when a couple is faced with pursuing medical options that health insurance will cover, or an adoption that ranges from $10,000-$40,000 dollars, it’s a tough choice to make. Some people can’t afford to adopt even if they want to, and some people can’t accept a child that’s not part of themselves.

  • Interesting blog choice… while I know that there really isn’t anything that is a “gray” issue, it’s hard to say if this advancement is right or wrong. On one hand, it could really help a lot of couples who want a biological child, but are scared of the health risks that IVF poses. On the other hand, just because something CAN be done, SHOULD it be done? While this is not cloning, it is taking the creation of life in a lab one step further. All in all, I would have to say that it’s a positive advancement, because it’s not that different from IVF, which I don’t believe is wrong. This process sounds as though it is safer for the woman. As for your question about whether or not some people are just not meant to have children, the Bible clearly says to multiply, and it praises the man who has many children. The Bible also views barrenness as a curse. There are so many environmental factors that can influence fertility, from pesticides to hormones in meat and dairy, that people who could be “meant” to have children could be rendered infertile from things they have no control over. The question of being able to manipulate having children ties into free will, and whether or not you believe that God preordains every event, or whether He allows us to alter our fates. As an adoptee, I would like to see the couples who can’t conceive adopt, because there are so many children across the world who are in desperate need of good homes. International orphanages are often worse than the prisons in the same country. Yet when a couple is faced with pursuing medical options that health insurance will cover, or an adoption that ranges from $10,000-$40,000 dollars, it’s a tough choice to make. Some people can’t afford to adopt even if they want to, and some people can’t accept a child that’s not part of themselves.

  • Thanks for the thoughtful comment. Great points about the Bible’s thoughts on having children, especially how it looks on barrenness as a curse: of course that begs the question of whether it really is a “curse”, and if so, whether humanity can exempt itself from it by medical means.

    I wonder if this sort of breakthrough is perhaps, like the God-given commission to multiply, a way for man to accomplish the man’s mission to subdue the earth.

    Of course cloning is a whole separate issue!

  • Steve

    Thanks for the thoughtful comment. Great points about the Bible’s thoughts on having children, especially how it looks on barrenness as a curse: of course that begs the question of whether it really is a “curse”, and if so, whether humanity can exempt itself from it by medical means.

    I wonder if this sort of breakthrough is perhaps, like the God-given commission to multiply, a way for man to accomplish the man’s mission to subdue the earth.

    Of course cloning is a whole separate issue!