Archive for the 'The Human Faces of God' Category

The Human Faces of God: polytheism in pre-exile Israel

Review: The Human Faces of God: What Scripture Reveals When It Gets God Wrong (and Why Inerrancy Tries to Hide It) Author: Thom Stark Wipf and Stock, 2010 Chapter 4: “Yahweh’s Ascendancy” Stark describes this chapter as an overview of “how Israel’s theology mirrored the various theologies of their neighbors, and how it was adapted over time […]

Thursday, December 2nd, 2010

The Human Faces of God: why criticize inerrancy?

Review: The Human Faces of God: What Scripture Reveals When It Gets God Wrong (and Why Inerrancy Tries to Hide It) Author: Thom Stark Wipf and Stock, 2010 Chapter 3: “Inerrancy Stunts Your Growth” Now, this is one chapter I thoroughly enjoyed. Stark spends the greater part exposing and surgically excising the internal logic used to defend […]

Tuesday, November 23rd, 2010

The Human Faces of God: the dubious hermeneutics of inerrancy

Review: The Human Faces of God: What Scripture Reveals When It Gets God Wrong (and Why Inerrancy Tries to Hide It) Author: Thom Stark Wipf and Stock, 2010 Chapter 2: “Inerrantists Do Not Exist” In an entertainingly rhetorical style, Stark spends the first part of this chapter defending its title. For the purposes of that argument, […]

Wednesday, November 10th, 2010

The Human Faces of God: diversity in the theologies of biblical authors

Review: The Human Faces of God: What Scripture Reveals When It Gets God Wrong (and Why Inerrancy Tries to Hide It) Author: Thom Stark Wipf and Stock, 2010 Chapter 1: “The Argument” “To put it bluntly: the Bible is an argument–with itself.” This is what I understand to be the theme of The Human Faces of God; […]

Wednesday, November 3rd, 2010

The Human Faces of God: front matter

Thom Stark’s The Human Faces of God is a book whose major arguments are developed through an essentially deconstructive methodology. Its purpose amounts to an undeception, stripping away unwarranted and harmful assumptions. As Yale’s esteemed OT critical scholar John J. Collins admits in the foreword, “Many critics will want to portray Stark’s book as negative, as […]

Friday, October 29th, 2010